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  • Posted by: Interband on Friday, July 25 2014 11:38 AM | Comments (0)

    Corporate Citizenship

    From more sustainable sourcing to social innovation, companies are doing more every day to create positive social change and sustainable solutions—and consumers are increasingly “rewarding” brands that take social responsibility seriously.   

    Super Market News reports that American supermarket chain, Safeway Inc., has made great strides in its efforts to sustainably source all fresh and frozen seafood by the end of 2015. The brand is already more than halfway to its goal, proving its leadership as a sustainable seafood retailer. In addition, Safeway has saved over 75 million gallons of water, eliminated 300 million plastic bags, and donated 72 million pounds of food.   

    Speaking of plastic bags, the infamous question of “paper or plastic?” may soon be a thing of the past. According to PackagingDigest.com, standard materials are being replaced with non-toxic, lower weight, biodegradable, reusable and recyclable alternatives. Also, bio-plastics are showing a growth rate of more than 20 percent with production expected to increase from 1.39 million tons in 2012 to 6.18 million tons by 2017. Why? Because packaging influences purchasing decisions—and more consumers are showing a preference for sustainable materials and design.   

    Picking up on the real-world solutions trend, Eco-Business reports that more organizations are moving beyond donations and philanthropy. Instead, they are becoming actively involved in projects that benefit business and have a positive social impact. Whether showing a focused commitment to a particular issue through a corporate foundation or embedding CSR into company operations, CSR programs and foundations boost employee morale and enhance corporate reputations. And the choice does not have to be one over the other—a greater CSR strategy can work simultaneously with a foundation.   

    As these efforts illustrate, businesses are doing a lot to give back—but are they doing enough? According to the 2013 UN Global Compact-Accenture CEO Study on Sustainability, as Sustainable Brands reports, two-thirds of CEOs admitted that businesses could be doing more to address sustainability challenges. Although CEOs see engagement with consumers as the single most important factor motivating them to accelerate progress on sustainability, they are often out of step with what motivates consumers to make responsible purchasing decisions.   

    To engage more effectively with consumers, companies must close the gap between performance and perception, according to Interbrand’s annual Best Global Green Brands report. Commenting on the report, Vikas Vij of JustMeans.com said, “The consumers of today hold the world’s top brands to an exacting standard and expect these brands to act responsibly.” As Interbrand’s research indicates, reducing the gap between socially and environmentally responsible business practices—and consumer perception of those practices—is critical to building brand value.   

    To find out more about the value of Corporate Citizenship, be sure to check out this month’s installment of Closing the Gap!

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  • Posted by: Lindsay Beltzer on Wednesday, July 23 2014 12:34 PM | Comments (0)

    Josh Feldmeth, CEO Interbrand North America

    Josh Feldmeth has been named CEO of Interbrand North America.

    Congratulations to Josh Feldmeth who has been named CEO of Interbrand North America. Josh’s promotion comes after serving as CEO of Interbrand’s New York, San Francisco, and Toronto offices since 2013. He succeeds Lee Carpenter, who is leaving Interbrand after 12 years.   

    Since joining Interbrand in 2002, Feldmeth has led brand engagements for clients including UPS, AT&T, and GE, among many others. As a noted expert in branding and business consulting, media outlets such as CNBC, Bloomberg TV, Advertising Age, and Mashable have sought his expertise on hot topics such as J.C. Penney’s market bounce back, the “branding” of the Republican Party, the personal brand of Stephen Colbert, and more.   

    Discussing his promotion, Feldmeth said, “Interbrand has been my professional home for over a decade—and for a good reason. I believe in our service offerings, our commitment to clients and, and above all else, our people. This is an exciting time for our business. It's a moment of transition when, more than ever before, we have the opportunity to help clients drive meaningful innovation and create world-changing experiences.”   

    Josh Feldmeth, Lee Carpenter, and Jez Frampton

    CEO of Interbrand North America, Josh Feldmeth, standing with Interbrand's Global CEO, Jez Frampton, and Lee Carpenter.

    More on Josh’s appointment can be found in the official press release.

    Connect with Josh on Twitter @joshfeldmeth.




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  • Posted by: Bethany Kelsall on Monday, July 21 2014 06:05 PM | Comments (0)

    London Bridge

    After receiving the very exciting news that I had won a D&AD Best of Year Award, I received an equally exciting invitation to apply to a competition that Interbrand was running for D&AD winners. With a chance to win either a 1-month internship in the London office, or a 3-month internship with 2 months in London and 1 month in another European office, it sounded like an incredible opportunity to see more of the world and grow professionally.  

    Needless to say, I was absolutely thrilled when I learned I had won the competition and got the 3-month internship! I couldn’t wait to go to London and get acquainted with the creative and strategic minds at Interbrand.   

    Interbrand London office

    Interbrand's London office (Each of the meeting rooms are named after the street locations of different Interbrand offices).

    I started in London at the beginning of May—welcomed by “the queen” out on the terrace, no less! Now I am in my last week at the London office, and I can’t believe how the time has flown. Having an interest in branding and a desire to work in the industry, my experience at Interbrand has given me a taste of what it’s really like to work in this creative business.   

    The Queen

    "The Queen" on Interbrand London's terrace.

    My time here has been so memorable and I have learned so much. Even the building that houses the Interbrand office is rich with history—it was once a hotel where the people who would be boarding the Titanic stayed the night before their fateful voyage. London is a place steeped in history, which is fascinating—but what really made my experience here brilliant was my work with the design team and the amazing people I’ve met at Interband.   

    The design team embraced me as one of their own and got me directly involved in live projects as well as internal work for the company. In my first week, I took some photographs of the latest InEdit publication that the London office produces. You can see InEdit online here.  

    InEdit The Retail Issue    

    There is one project in particular that I have really been able to sink my teeth into and I have loved every minute! It involves the rebranding of a bank in Asia. I have been carrying out audits, researching the current brand identity, and working with other creatives and a strategy team on the rebrand.   

    Most recently, I have been exploring different territories for the brand and have designed initial design concepts for each territory, visually exploring the different directions the brand could take. I have been so pleased to have to chance to work on this project and I know the end result will be a great success. Having the opportunity to see a project from the very beginning stages through to the design process and being part of the team (attending meetings and being present for discussions with clients) have all been part of my real-world education.   

    Another educational perk at Interbrand are the incredible guest speakers. During my time in London, I’ve been fortunate to attend two talks and both were very inspiring and interesting. It was great to get the chance to listen to designer Jason Bruges, who creates bespoke interactive installations for a diverse range of clients, and Decoded, proponents of “digital enlightenment” strategy. Both talks opened up my understanding of the digital world and its creative possibilities.

    Interbrand London—what an experience it has been! But my internship adventure is not over yet. Next stop? Madrid!  

    I am extremely excited about the next chapter of this unfolding journey and can’t wait to experience more in yet another country. In London, I have loved it all—and I’m sure I will love Madrid just as much!  

    Bethany Kelsall is an intern with Interbrand in London and Madrid. You can follow her on Twitter @beth_kelsall.

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  • Posted by: Michael Mitchell on Tuesday, July 8 2014 01:09 PM | Comments (0)

    Michael Mitchell joined Interbrand’s Verbal Identity team in New York as a Creative Writer 4 years ago. His daily work with the Verbal team included a blend of copywriting, strategic messaging, tagline development, name generation, and more. Upon learning that he could take these skills and apply them internationally, he joined our global mobility program. Below, Michael answers a few questions about the program and his adopted city, Singapore.

    What initially led you to want to transfer to Singapore? What were you hoping to take away from the experience? 

    I wanted international business experience and cultural immersion. Interbrand has 30+ offices, so it seemed there would be plenty of opportunity to work abroad. As an English-speaking Verbal Identity consultant, I knew I would have to transfer to a market that worked primarily in my native language. In that regard, the Singapore office was an option. I'd already met two members of the Singapore team while at Interbrand Academy in Korea, so it felt perfect.  

     IB Singapore 

    Has anything been surprising to you about your new city?

    Singapore is on the equator, and it’s very hot—every day. So, the joke is that Singapore has the world’s best air conditioning, and it’s true! Every building you step into is ice cold. It’s impressive, and slightly scary.   

    What advice would you give to others who are interested in global mobility? 

    Do it. As I got on the Singapore Airlines flight leaving New York, I was unsure, intimtidated and frightened—and that’s how I knew I’d made the right decision. The business opportunity and cultural immersion has allowed me to grow, learn, and push myself in ways I never thought possible. Anyone who takes advantage of global mobility opportunities at Interbrand is bound to have an incredible, life-changing experience.  

    Singapore streets

    What do you like best about your new city? 

    Singapore is a sparkling melting pot. It’s modern and lush, with a wonderfully diverse population. And with all that human diversity comes an amazing variety of food—this is a playground for foodies!   

    What specific projects have you been able to work on? 

    The Singapore office services the entire Southeast Asia region. As a result, I’ve been able to do work for clients from Thailand, Indonesia, Brunnei, and Malaysia, as well as for Northern Asia brands from Japan, South Korea, and China. I was fortunate to be part projects in Sydney, Australia as well. The work has ranged from brand voice and messaging to tagline development and naming work. I also published a Verbal Identity article in a regional marketing magazine!   

    Singapore city view

    What is most valuable idea you have discovered thus far? 

    We’re all a lot more similar than we are different. I believe in market analysis, audience segmentation, and big data—but being immersed here has made me realize that, while cultures differ, people are people at the end of the day. The most successful brands know that. Brands that can tap into universal human themes and sentiment can thrive globally.   

    Singapore team     

    Michael Mitchell is a Creative Writer and Verbal Identity consultant working at Interbrand’s Singapore office. 


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  • Posted by: Dominik Prinz on Wednesday, July 2 2014 04:40 PM | Comments (0)

    The annual “Good Pitch” in NYC is a unique event. Bringing together documentary filmmakers and thought leaders from both for-profit and not-for-profit organizations, it is meant to inspire. But, most importantly, this meeting of the minds catalyzes powerful partnerships aimed at solving some of the world’s most pressing issues.    

    Change is a tricky thing to achieve. Especially when it comes to social justice. It requires a strong, clear vision others can rally around. It requires powerful incentives that motivate others to join in. And it requires persistence, because change doesn’t come easily.   

    All these ingredients were present in abundance last week, when one of several global Good Pitch events opened its gates to various filmmakers in New York: Each and every one of them introduced a personal vision of what needs to change in the world to make it more just, more tolerant, more sustainable, and more balanced.   

    The issues raised by the participating filmmakers ranged from critiques of the American criminal justice system to conservation. 3 ½ Minutes, for example, dissects the tragic shooting death of teenager, Jordan Davis, and the legal controversy surrounding the case. Another film, Seed, follows farmers and scientists trying to protect the diversity of agriculture and highlights the battle for the future of our seeds. And the documentary, Virunga, tells the incredible story of the brave people risking their lives to save a World Heritage site in the Congo—home to the last of the mountain gorillas and one of the most bio-diverse places on earth.   

    Opening up the event, Darren Walker, President of the Ford Foundation, affirmed the important role films like these play in furthering positive social change. “The arts,” he said, “are a profound means of improving the human experience; and film is a timeless ally in the ongoing quest for justice.”   

    I could not agree more. We live in a fast-paced, attention span challenged world where younger people often gain more education and inspiration through short films and YouTube video clips than they do through the written word. And the fact that there was no dry eye in the room when Jordan Davis’ parents talked about the unimaginable pain caused by the injustice inflicted upon their son was a testament to the power of visual storytelling to raise awareness and inspire transformative action.   

    That’s where Good Pitch adds a unique (and indispensable) ingredient to the filmmakers’ vision and persistence: it facilitates engagement and allows influential allies and members of civil society to learn about—and get behind—each filmmaker’s cause. Whether it’s on-the-spot financial support to complete a film’s production, or PR and media connections that help amplify its reach, the collective action this gathering of change-makers inspires transcends the room it takes place in. By supporting documentary filmmaking and expanding the audience for social justice-focused films, the Good Pitch’s galvanizing spirit brings these stories to more people. As viewers, we are invited to bear witness, to join the fight against injustice, and to awaken our own potential for visionary leadership and activism, as well.   

    Events like Good Pitch provide yet another pathway of empowerment, enabling people to learn more about what’s not working in the world and giving them the tools to do something about it. From Kickstarter and Crowdrise, to dosomething.org and causes.com—these platforms for change can only be enriched by thought-provoking documentary films. After all, being aware of a problem is the first step in fixing it.    

    The fact that the event gives representatives of the branding and business world a seat at the table speaks to the important role some of the most recognized brands play in this conversation. The Fords, Patagonias, Googles, and Netflixes of this world can—and must—use their sphere of influence to scale the vision of filmmakers such as those who participated in Good Pitch. Those with immense resources and influence can do much to accelerate the kinds of changes we all want to see in this world.   

    Dominik Prinz is Strategy Director at Interbrand New York. Follow him on Twitter: @DomPrinz

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